Arbitration appeals part of new AAA rules

Southern California Appellate News reports that the American Arbitration Association has released optional rules that will allow appellate review within the arbitration process for arbitrations conducted under AAA rules. From the AAA press release:

AAA President and CEO India Johnson explains that traditionally, an arbitration award is set aside by a court only where narrowly-designed statutory grounds exist. These new rules provide for an appeal within the arbitration process and are consistent with the objective of an expedited, cost-effective and just appellate arbitral process. Ms. Johnson states, “The appellate arbitral panel called for under the new rules applies a standard of review more expansive than that allowed by existing federal and state statutes to vacate an award. In this regard, the optional rules were developed for the types of large, complex cases where the parties agree that the ability to appeal is particularly important.”

Ms. Johnson expects the new optional rules will be well received by parties who desire a broader ability to appeal. “These rules and the process they govern are well thought out, practical and anticipate a process that can be completed in about three months.”

Three months! That’s really something.

See the press release for a bullet-point summary of the rules and a link to the actual rules.

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply


Wanting to leave an <em>phasis on your comment?

Trackback URL http://www.calblogofappeal.com/2013/11/06/arbitration-appeals-part-of-new-aaa-rules/trackback/
Blog Proprietor

This blog is brought to you exclusively by attorney Greg May, an "of counsel" attorney with Jones & Lester, LLP in Oxnard, California, who can handle your appeal anywhere in California.

The views expressed on this blog are those of Greg May only, not the views of the Jones & Lester partnership or any other attorney in the firm. The content offered on this blog is provided solely for purposes of news and commentary. It is not legal advice and should not be relied on as such.

View Greg May's profile on LinkedIn